Journal

Classical Imagery Renaissance – The Final: Part 2 of 2


  So I’ve spent much of the morning working on the following animation to showcase the major events of the Renaissance. It’s a little bit better than the previous one and this time all the dates are spot on with a little commentary at the bottom. This should be just weird enough to stick in your (and hopefully my) mind.

  So lets see. Where should we go next now that that is done (this thing is roughly a minute and a half long and it took me hours to complete).

  Real quickly lets do a crash course through the paintings that were on the last exam and are likely to show their face again.

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This is the Primavera, from right to left we have Zephyr, Chloris, Flora, Venus (Below), Cupid (Above), the Three Graces, and Hermes.

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This is Pallas (Athena) and the Centaur, from right to left you have Pallas (Athena) and the Centaur. I’m sure you figured that out though.

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This is the Birth of Venus, from right to left we have Hour (a season), Venus, Zephyr (Male) and Zephyr (female). This one raises some confusion since the winds are blowing flowers (like Flora) and the season or Hour looks like…well Flora. Methinks that Botticelli was just horny for Flora in general.

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This is Leonardo’s Vitruvian Man, he is 8 heads tall and fits perfectly within a square and a circle (considered to be the two most sanctimonious shapes). Now I would like to take this moment to say shame on Microsoft for not having Vitruvian in their dictionary.

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That is the Florence baptistry, it makes a lot of sense why it would have been used for Linear Perspective. You can attribute two big events, the battle of Ghiberti and Brunellesci as well as the discovery of LP to this structure. So its a nice way to keep multitudes of information in your brain.

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Massacio’s Tribute Money is a great example of Horizon Line Isocephaly, in other words the horizon line is at the head height of the figures and more importantly all the angles should point your eyes to Jesus. He was always a sucker for attention.

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Pietro Perugino’s Peter Receiving the Keys, easy to remember as it is someone retrieving keys, Also Pietro and Peter kind of sound the same. The horizon line here is at the doorway to the building in the back (that looks a lot like the baptistry). Follow the tiles on the ground for confirmation.

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Leonardo’s Last Supper is another example of using Isocephaly and Linear Perspective to draw everyone’s eye to Jesus. It makes sense, if you are going to do a picture of Jesus you figure he’ll be the main point of the image.

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On your left is Brunelleschi’s entry for the baptistry and on the right is Ghiberti. The level of detail on Ghiberti’s is likely what got him the win.

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Massacio’s Holy Trinity is another example of using LP to draw the eye to Jesus. Although I’m not sure why there is such an attraction to the whole…you know…dead or dying Jesus.

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On your left you have Donatello’s take at David. Standing over the decapitated head of Goliath. I was under the impression that he wore clothes and didn’t use weaponry outside of a sling and stone but maybe I’m just misinformed (likely). On your right you have Verocchio’s take on David, has armor but it is skin tight and once again standing over a decapitated head of Goliath. Finally you have Michelangelo’s David. He opted for a more adult dude, but naked nonetheless.

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This is Donatello’s St. George, I know I won’t remember his name well but hopefully you will. I suppose the cross on his shield should help remember the sainthood.

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We begin with Verocchio’s mobster looking “Colleoni Monument” followed by Donatello’s Awesomely named “Gattamelata” in the middle, and Marcus Aurelius by…someone?

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We have both sides of the Medici chapel here done by Michelangelo. The four naked folks underneath the two Medici are the times of day, on the left you have day and night and on the right you have morning and evening.

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In both of these pictures you have St. Bernard talking with the Virgin Mary in works titled “Vision of St. Bernard”. On left you have Filippo Lippi’s version and on the right is Pietro Perugino. Notice the softer tones of Perugino’s work. That is what sets him apart from the more harsh works of the time (line wise).

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Albrecht Durer’s Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, then Knight, Death, and the Devil, and Adam and Eve. Try and remember these four, his works are sort of unique in that they are all grayscale and sharp drawn so it should be easy to punch him onto them.

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Hugo van der Goes “Portinari Altar” is an example of someone influencing those in Italy rather than the reverse happening. His influence can be seen most prominently in the following.

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You’ll notice those three dudes on the right and the troth being in both images. This one is done by Domenico Ghirlandaio.

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Shooting for the worlds most complicated name Antonio del Pollaiuolo is the artist behind both the sculpture and the painting. Each showing the battle of Hercules vs. Antaeus.

Lastly we have 4 works (one you’ve seen before) apparently nobody knows who did them but they are all four important and their names should be on your mind if you are taking the exam.

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The first is Marcus Aurelius, followed by Belvedere Apollo and the Belvedere Torso, and finally the Laocoon Group.

  I hope I’ve hit everything. If anyone who is taking the exam noticed some big holes feel free to send me an email and I’ll put them up. I too will be looking at this before the exam to refresh my memory ;).

  PS. That reminds me. Important to remember, Verrochio was Leonardo’s Teacher, Ghirlandaio was Michelangelo’s Teacher, and Perugino was Raphael’s. Just remember that daio sounds like angelo, Perugino and Raphael have p’s and r’s in their names, and that Rochio and Nardo are similar. Or you could just be a good student and remember them the old fashion way. But you know how that is :P.

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